51–261 ⋅ Exercise 3 • Typographic Hierarchy + Sketches

Section 1: Exercise 3 • Typographic Hierarchy

Linespacing Select one weight (Helvetica Neue light, regular, medium, bold). Set all the type in that weight. Insert one full linespace between any two lines of type, once or more than once, throughout all the lines. You may not insert more than one full linespace between any two lines of type.

Typographic weights Select any two weights (Helvetica Neue light, regular, medium, bold). Set all the type in a combination of those two weights. For your option 2, explore all four weights in combination. No linespacing.

Horizontal shift or Indentation Select one weight (Helvetica Neue light, regular, medium, bold). Shift lines of type horizontally left or right, resulting in only two or three flush-left margins. No linespacing.

Peer review edits:

things are aligned left, but w diff lefts

Typographic weight & linespacing Select any two weights (Helvetica Neue light, regular, medium, bold). Insert one full linespace between any two lines of type, once or more than once, throughout all the lines. You may not insert more (or less) than one full linespace between any two lines of type.

Typographic weights & horizontal shift Select any two weights (Helvetica Neue a light, regular, medium, bold). Shift lines of type horizontally left or right, resulting in only two flush-left margins. No linespacing.

Horizontal shift & linespacing Select one weight (Helvetica Neue light, regular, medium, bold). Insert one full linespace between any two lines of type, once or more than once, throughout all the lines. Shift lines of type horizontally left or right, resulting in only two flush-left margins.

Size change & typographic weight Select any two weights (Helvetica Neue light, regular, medium, bold). Use a change of point size to emphasize hierarchical differences. You may change the order of the information, if you wish. Horizontal shifts and linespacing are optional. This is your call. Think carefully.

Section 2: Sketches

  1. Research on Typeface

Your research should include the origins of the typeface. Who designed it and when? What type classification does it fall under? Was is created for a specific purpose or context? Are there any specific uses of it that led to its popularity? Are there any features that set it apart? Post your findings to your blog, this will begin your process documentation post. Study the letterforms and get to know them.

Garamond: a family of old-style serif typefaces derived from the work of Claude Garamond in the sixteenth century

Type Classification: Old-style, Category: Serif

Garamond-style typefaces are popular and particularly often used for book printing and body text.

Contemporary versions: Adobe Garamond, Garamond Premier, Stempel Garamond, EB Garamond, Sabon, ITC Garamond, etc.

Distinctive features about Garamond:

  • an ‘e’ with a small eye and the bowl of the ‘a’ which has a sharp turn at top left.
  • Clear stroke contrast and capital letters on the model of Roman square capitals.
  • The ‘M’ is slightly splayed with outward-facing serifs at the top (sometimes only on the left) and the leg of the ‘R’ extends outwards from the letter.
  • The x-height (height of lower-case letters) is low, especially at larger sizes, making the capitals large relative to the lower case, while the top serifs on the ascenders of letters like ‘d’ have a downward slope and ride above the cap height.
  • The axis of letters like the ‘o’ is diagonal and the bottom right of the italic ‘h’ bends inwards.
  • Besides general characteristics, writers on type have generally praised the even quality of Garamond’s type.

Sketches for the Poster

Peer Review: Highlighting features specific to Garamond.

large-ish spaced letters, look at publications in 16th century

Diagonal, straight, goes with this font, provides visual variation.

Citation from:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garamond#:~:text=Garamond%20is%20a%20group%20of,book%20printing%20and%20body%20text.

https://garamond.org/